Sunday, November 14, 2010

My Daruma Doll...


...when a friend came over today, we were talking for awhile...and she once again (for about the millionth time) made me realize that I constantly talk myself out of taking chances, trying to figure out where I want to take myself, and essentially freezing myself in place because of Fear...this has been a hard habit to break...and I'm talking years...for the better part of my life...it's the choice I find myself making over and over again...you'd think I'd figure this crap out by now...but no...


...she's right...as she usually is when it comes to me...for the most part...I love how well she knows me...and sometimes it makes me nuts...so later this afternoon, I was thinking how a few weeks ago I felt as though I was getting better at stopping myself from the self-sabotage...then...it started all over again...so here I am...stopping the pattern again...

...which brings me to this: my Daruma doll....

...it was in September when I put my Daruma into play...when I was stopping myself from delving into fear and trying to be more positive and move forward constantly...that was my goal...and I had begun...then I had a relapse...so I'm putting my Daruma in a new place, so I can be reminded of my goals...and strive to move forward...here's a little background...

-----The Daruma doll, also known as Dharma doll, is a Japanese traditional Buddhist omocha, or toy, used in goal-setting and wishing for good luck in achieving that goal. The dolls are fashioned after the Zen Buddhist monk, Bodhidharma.
These dolls are typically red in color, rounded, and bearded, made of papier mache and hollow; though a wide variation in style and decoration can be seen. The dolls are weighted on the bottom so that when tipped they will return to their upright position, a sign of persistence and overcoming adversity.
Facial hair decorations on the Daruma represents longevity, the eyebrows shaped like a crane and the hair on the cheeks symbolically appearing as the shell of a tortoise, two animals known in Japanese traditions to mean long life.


Use of the Daruma in Goal-Setting

When a Daruma doll is purchased, it has two white blank areas for eyes. A goal is set by the owner and one eye is colored in while wishing for help in achieving that goal. When the goal is achieved, the other eye is painted in. At the end of a year, all Daruma dolls are collected and taken to the temple where they were purchased to be burned in order to complete the tradition. Thanks is given for the help of the dolls and new dolls are purchased for the next year. The burning ceremony includes the appearance of the monks, reading of sutras, blowing horns, and burning the thousands of daruma dolls together.-----


...and here he is...



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